French Toast Crunch Cereal

Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal has been a mainstay on kids’ breakfast tables and shop shelves for decades. And for awhile, French Toast Crunch was another option from General Mills cereals that plenty of children enjoyed on occasion.

French Toast Crunch Cereal

In the 1990s, you could also serve them a bowl of French Toast Crunch. This General Mills cereal, like Cinnamon Toast Crunch, took a typical morning item and flipped it on its head. It was officially discontinued in 2006, however it was revived in December 2014 to satisfy any sweet toothed lovers.

Surge

Surge was initially marketed in Norway in 1996 under the name Urge by the Coca-Cola business. It was created to compete with Pepsi’s debut of Mountain Dew at the time.

Surge

Surge, the drink’s full, more recognized name, was debuted in the United States in 1997. It was canceled after its original run ended in 2003, leaving many ’90s youth dissatisfied. However, there have been some indications that this classic is making a resurgence in recent years.

Nabisco Giggles

Nabisco Giggles were snack cookies with a big smile and a creamy filling like Oreos. They emerged and peaked in popularity around the 1990s, although they lingered a little longer.

Nabisco Giggles

However, by the early 1990s, we had to bid our final goodbyes to these snack-time pleasures. While there are many of cookies available for purchase at your local grocery store, we still miss them. Even worse, it doesn’t appear like Nabisco intends to reintroduce them.

Crystal Pepsi

You can technically buy Crystal Pepsi right now, but it isn’t quite the same as it was back in the ’90s. Since then, this transparent soft drink has undergone various alterations.

Crystal Pepsi

Originally, this Pepsi drink was touted as a “healthier” soft drink option. The firm promoted it as caffeine-free, and the clear tint was associated with wellness. It was released in the early 1990s and was discontinued in 1993. It’s back, but with a new, caffeinated mix.

Bubble Beeper

On the surface, all gum appears to be the same, yet there are variances that set specific kinds and tastes apart.

Bubble Beeper

Bubble Beeper was one brand that distinguished out in the 1990s. This was due in part to the packaging’s ease of usage as a clip-on coin purse, in addition to the candy itself. With the assistance of a few disputes, the sweet eventually went out of vogue, and Bubble Beeper gum was discontinued.

Twix Cookies-n-Creme Bars

Twix Cookies-n-Creme Bars were launched with another flavor, Chocolate Fudge, although it did not receive nearly as much attention as the Cookies-n-Creme. The good news is that Twix released a new edition in 2020, after the long-awaited resurrection of the classic.

Twix Cookies-n-Creme Bars

These chocolate bars were introduced in 1990, and instead of Twix’s characteristic caramel center, they featured a chocolate biscuit coated in cream and a coating of milk chocolate. They were only available for about a year before being withdrawn.

Squeezits

Squeezits first appeared in the 1980s. The firm followed a typical marketing strategy at the time: the more colorful a meal or drink was, the more appealing it would be to children.

Squeezits

This drink came in a variety of tastes and even in black bottles to conceal the color of the drink for a secret surprise. However, as the 1990s drew to a conclusion, sales began to fall, and manufacture of the drink was formally halted in 2001.

Oatmeal Swirlers

Oatmeal is one breakfast option that seldom brings a grin to the faces of youngsters. Oatmeal Swirlers worked hard to flip this idea on its head. Oatmeal Swirlers, which were popular in the 1980s and early 1990s, featured containers of fruit jelly paste for each package of instant oatmeal.

Oatmeal Swirlers

These flavor packages might be used by children to create artwork and give a bit extra flavor to their meal. The product was discontinued, although related items such as Dinosaur Eggs Oatmeal outlasted it for a short time.

Josta Soda

In the 1990s, Pepsi introduced a slew of novel and intriguing products. Josta soda is one of those items that we no longer have access to. This soft drink was the first energy drink released by a major beverage manufacturer in the United States.

Josta Soda

It ran from 1995 to 1999, but it has a cult following because of efforts to bring it back, including a website called Save Josta. So far, it does not appear like Pepsi is interested in responding to these requests.

Hi-C Ecto Cooler Juice Boxes

If there was one thing that exploded in popular culture in the 1980s and 1990s, it was fans’ reaction to watching Ghostbusters on the big screen. Hi-C responded by releasing their Ecto Cooler Juice Boxes.

Hi-C Ecto Cooler Juice Boxes

These juice cartons were orange and tangerine flavored, but the firm altered the color of the drink to green to match the appearance of ectoplasm in the film. The juice was first introduced in 1989, but it was discontinued in 1997, with a brief resurgence in 2016.

Trix Swirls

For a long time, there has been a movement to offer distinctive and, supposedly, healthier food to youngsters. Trix attempted to replicate this with the Trix Swirls in the 1990s and early 2000s.

Trix Swirls

When you opened these yogurt possibilities, they were two colors and came in a range of flavors, sweetened from how yogurt tastes naturally. Trix Swirls were withdrawn with little explanation later on, and they are no longer available. The yogurt snacks were most likely abandoned owing of a lack of profit.

P.B. Crisps

Planters, like Nutter Butters, had its own peanut-shaped graham cracker cookie with a delicious peanut butter filling. Mr. Peanut offered us Planters’ version, dubbed P.B. Crisps.

P.B. Crisps

These originally appeared on store shelves in 1992, but they didn’t stay long. They were discontinued in 1994, but Planters provided an unusual explanation for the snack’s demise. They said that the snack was terminated because it was simply too tasty. That sounds like a good reason to retain them!

Soda-Licious Fruit Snacks

There are several fruit snacks to pick from. Many kids requested their parents in the 1990s to buy them some Soda-Licious Fruit Snacks on their next shopping trip.

Soda-Licious Fruit Snacks

Betty Crocker created these fruit treats in collaboration with 7-Up. They had tastes that were both delicious and evocative of some of our favorite soft drinks from the time. The Soda-Licious Fruit Snacks vanished in the 1990s, and we mourn their sweet flavor.

Butterfingers BB’s

Candy fans will recall the Butterfingers BB’s fondly. Butterfinger’s attempt to create a snack comparable to Whoppers resulted in these sweets.

Butterfingers BB’s

They first appeared on store shelves in 1992 and remained there until 2006. During this time, they saw a surge in popularity. After all, they were marketed on famous series such as The Simpsons to help boost sales. It’s a pity we can’t sample any more of these marble-sized chocolate morsels.

Wonderball

Wonderball, like Kinder Eggs, was a confectionery with a chocolate shell and a treat within. These sweets evolved into tiny hard candies that children could eat with their chocolate.

Wonderball

Unfortunately, because children did not break the chocolate to get the reward out before eating it, it became a choking danger. As a result, the candies were phased out in 1997. The manufacturer reintroduced them in 2000 with edible delights inside, but the problem persisted, and they vanished again in 2007.

Apple Newtons

Nabisco’s Fig Newtons are a staple. They provide a tasty, bite-sized snack when you need it, and they’re even available in a number of various flavors, which eventually led to the moniker Newtons being dropped.

Apple Newtons

Nabisco introduced an apple flavor for its Newtons in the 1990s, but it didn’t last the decade. Later, with the debut of a baked apple and cinnamon taste, an adjusted version of this flavor was created, although it doesn’t quite match up.

Skippy Squeeze Stix

The Skippy Squeeze Stix had a simple principle. It was simply a tube of Skippy peanut butter, or indeed their chocolate peanut butter, that you could consume on the go and not make a big mess with.

Skippy Squeeze Stix

In general, these foods were based on the same principle as several snacks that are still available today, such as Gogurt. There is no obvious explanation for why these treats vanished from shop shelves, although it is likely due to poor promotion or the increased knowledge of peanut allergies.

Fruit-Shaped Trix Cereal

You can buy a box of Trix cereal virtually everywhere nowadays, but if you haven’t eaten it in a while, you might be startled by what you see when you serve a bowl.

Fruit-Shaped Trix Cereal

The cereal was created in 1991, and while it is still available, the basic fruit-shaped cereal pieces are no longer available. General Mills chose to rethink the design in 2006, and the cereal was transformed into simple popped corn puffs. How boring!

Fruitopia

Fruitopia is one of numerous soft drinks produced by Coca-Cola over the course of their history. It was originally shown in 1994 and lasted till 2003.

Fruitopia

Fruitopia is a fruit-flavored soft drink available in strawberry, kiwi, tangerine, watermelon, and other tastes. Coca-Cola still sells identical goods under the Minute Maid brand today. Curiously, despite the fact that it has mostly been abandoned, you may still encounter certain beverages with this name in various places.

Hershey’s BarNone

Countless people’s favorite chocolate bars are made by Hershey. They invented the BarNone chocolate bar in 1987, and it was quite successful for a long time!

Hershey’s BarNone

They were originally prepared with cocoa wafers, peanuts, a chocolate filling, and a milk chocolate covering. However, in 1992, the recipe was altered such that the candy bars had wafer, caramel, peanuts, and a chocolate coating. This was not as effective, and they were phased out in 1997.

Keebler Baked Munch ‘Ems

In the 1990s, if you wanted a salty snack, you might have gone into your cabinet and picked out a box of Keebler Baked Munch ‘Ems. According to Keebler, they were “baked ’til they crunch like chips.”

Keebler Baked Munch ‘Ems

These were offered in a number of varieties, including the classic, ranch, cheddar, and sour cream and onion tastes. More varieties were then added to the collection. That is, until the rivalry grew too strong and the crackers were phased out later in the decade.

Jell-O-1-2-3

While it was popular in the 1990s, Kraft launched Jell-O-1-2-3 much earlier — in 1969! This Jell-O was tiered and worked like magic.

Jell-O-1-2-3

The Jell-O was packaged in a single bag, but it was designed to separate into three unique layers once it set. This contained a regular Jell-O bottom, a custard-like middle layer, and a frothy top layer. The 1990s proved to be the last decade for this snack, which was discontinued in 1996.

Shark Bites

Gummy treats have long been a favorite among children. There was much to select from back in the ’90s as well! Theoretically, these snacks still exist, but the recipe has been drastically altered, and they most likely will not taste the same as you recall.

Shark Bites

Shark Bites, on the other hand, piqued the interest of many children. These delectable nibbles were fairly normal gummy snacks, but they stood out for their marine-themed forms in addition to fulfilling a sweet taste.

Keebler Magic Middles

Keebler Magic Middles, another dessert with filling, took a somewhat different approach than brands like Oreo. Instead of being sandwiched between two cookies, the filling was baked into the middle of each cookie.

Keebler Magic Middles

The shortbread cookies may have appeared ordinary on the exterior, but they were filled with taste on the inside. You may also select a cookie with a peanut butter filling or a luscious, fudge-filled cookie. These were popular in the 1980s and 1990s, but have since been phased out.

Orbitz Water

Orbitz Water was a flavored water brand that debuted in 1997 but barely lasted a year before being purchased by the travel business Orbitz. There were other varieties available, including Blueberry Melon Strawberry and Pineapple Banana Cherry Coconut.

Orbitz Water

The gelatinous balls that floated around in the liquid, however, were what truly made them stand out. This not only made the beverages palatable, but it also gave them the appearance of lava lamps, making them eye-catching.

Melody Pops

Melody Pops was one of several brands that sold a type of confectionery known as whistle pops. As the name implies, they were sweets that could be eaten as well as used as a whistle.

Melody Pops

While the confectionery was manufactured by a number of firms, the 1990s witnessed a surge in interest for Melody Pops by Chupa Chups. Melody Pops were withdrawn by this firm in 2015 for a few years. Fortunately, you can now find these candies again, but not at the grocery checkout line.

PB Max

Mars introduced its PB Max candy bars to retailers across the United States in 1989 and 1990. A cookie and peanut butter mixture was encased in a milk chocolate covering in these treats.

PB Max

Surprisingly, Mars had a relatively successful journey! The candy sold around $50 million in a single year. Nonetheless, they were taken off shop shelves shortly after their distribution for the strange reason that one of the Mars brothers didn’t like peanut butter.

Pop-Tarts Crunch

Making our favorite treats into breakfast cereal seems to be a popular trend in the 1990s. Kellogg’s Pop-Tarts Crunch cereal was one of the items that emerged from this craze.

Pop-Tarts Crunch

This cereal is exactly what the name implies like: small Pop-Tarts that are “Pop-Tarts for your spoon,” as Kellogg’s puts it. Strawberry and brown sugar cinnamon tastes were offered for this cereal. They first appeared on shop shelves in 1994, but then vanished in 1995.

Life Savers Holes

Life Savers are a popular candy that you can still find at the checkout counter or at the convenience shop. Life Savers Holes, on the other hand, are no longer visible.

Life Savers Holes

While most children are familiar with the rings of Life Savers, these candies were the centers that the normal Life Savers lacked. While they were delectable, they had a short shelf life and were removed off shop shelves in early 1991 due to a choking danger.

Flintstones Push-Up Pops

As we’ve seen time and again, one of the main reasons that many of our favorite treats from the ’90s are no longer available is that the characters used to sell them are no longer as popular.

Flintstones Push-Up Pops

This was the situation with the well-known Flintstones Push-Up Pops. These were primarily basic and depicted Flintstones characters eating sherbert. However, these summertime delights steadily faded away over the early 2000s. Unfortunately, comparable items do not elicit the same level of nostalgia.

Jumpin’ Jack Cheese Doritos

While nacho cheese is a traditional flavor, Doritos has experimented with new concepts throughout the years. For a while, their Jumpin’ Jack Cheese Doritos were popular.

Jumpin’ Jack Cheese Doritos

This new flavor of chips was debuted in 1990 with Jay Leno’s sponsorship. These Doritos featured a Monterey Jack flavor, as the name says. They were only available for a short time before being withdrawn, however they were briefly reintroduced in 2013 as a limited edition throwback taste.

Mickey’s Parade Ice Pops

If there’s one thing that hasn’t changed, it’s that nothing gets youngsters as excited about a snack as associating it to their favorite characters. Nonetheless, these traits appear to shift with the passage of time.

Mickey’s Parade Ice Pops

Disney seized on this marketing strategy in the 1990s with Mickey’s Parade Ice Pops. These went above merely delivering kid-friendly packaging and box art and included ice pops fashioned like well-known Disney characters such as Mickey Mouse, Minnie Mouse, Donald Duck, and Goofy.

Triple Tower Push Pops

One of the few drawbacks of having so many various varieties of sweets is having to decide which one you want the most. Triple Tower Push Pops addressed this issue by combining three distinct tastes in one.

Triple Tower Push Pops

Officially, this candy is still available online, although it has been removed from retail shelves for some time. Topps withdrew it in this form in the early 2000s, which is rather remarkable for a product that has been around since 1986.

Hostess Chocodiles

Hostess Chocodiles, which first appeared in the 1980s, were essentially Twinkies with a chocolate covering. The treat was named after Hostess’ first mascot, Chauncey, a crocodile.

Hostess Chocodiles

This snack was initially launched in the 1980s, however it was formally phased out in 1999. If you truly miss this ’90s snack food, you’re not entirely out of luck. Chocodiles were reintroduced after a 15-year sabbatical into a fun-sized shape that’s easy to munch on. It’s not identical, but it’s close!

Snapple Element Drinks

Snapple is a well-known brand that has been in business since its inception in 1972. Over the years, they’ve introduced a slew of new Snapple flavors and varieties to the market.

Snapple Element Drinks

Snapple is a well-known brand that has been in business since its inception in 1972. Over the years, they’ve introduced a slew of new Snapple flavors and varieties to the market.

Jell-O Pudding Pops

Jell-O Pudding Pops were popular in the 1980s and 1990s. These treats made an effect, from the frozen aisle to sponsorships from renowned personalities at the time.

Jell-O Pudding Pops

These frozen delights were sticky sweetness on a stick, similar to a popsicle, but instead of sweetened fruit juice, they used Jell-O pudding as the filling. They were successful for the firm that sold them, but they have since been discontinued. This might be attributed to increased consumer health consciousness.

Cheetos Paws

Cheetos Paws aren’t actually discontinued, as many of the snacks on this list are. However, you would be hard pushed to find them as readily as you could in the 1990s.

Cheetos Paws

This Cheeto was shaped like a paw, similar to the ones worn by the brand’s mascot, Chester Cheetah. They were originally produced in 1990, but they were thought to be discontinued in 1993. If you want a bag of this delight right now, you may have to place an order online.

Reggie! Bar

When you were younger and desired a tasty treat from the candy aisle, you could have offered a Reggie! Let’s give it a go. This was a milk chocolate candy bar with peanuts and caramel within.

Reggie! Bar

The candy was first produced in 1976 and was eventually discontinued in 1982. Fortunately for us, the candy bar had a brief resurgence in the 1990s, however it is no longer available. The name was inspired by Reggie Jackson, a Yankees baseball star.

Oreo Big Stuf

The Oreo Big Stuf product is presumably only nostalgic for youngsters born in the early 1990s. After all, it had been on the market for seven years until it was withdrawn very early in the decade. Oreo Big Stuf, we barely knew ye!

Oreo Big Stuf

These Oreos were sold individually rather than in sleeves like regular Oreos. It’s no surprise, given the size of these biscuits! This is another ’90s pleasure that has been lost to time, most likely owing to a combination of greater USDA health awareness and poor commercial margins.

Doritos 3Ds

Doritos 3Ds were a popular choice to carry in your lunch or grab as an afterschool snack throughout the 1990s. Nonetheless, they were phased out in the early 2000s. Which was too bad for all of the kids who grew up munching on these.

Doritos 3Ds

These Doritos had many of the same tastes as conventional Doritos, but their form set them apart. They were puffier and had an air-filled middle, making them a little odd to chew on. While there are no longer Doritos 3Ds available, the concept was reintroduced in 2015 with the Doritos Jacked 3D.

Sprinkle Spangles

Sprinkle Spangles is the only short-lived breakfast cereal that General Mills wishes they could bring back into their lineup. This wonderful cereal was initially released in the mid-’90s, and Hidden Treasures was one of its sibling cereals that also debuted around the same time.

Sprinkle Spangles

All of the star-shaped portions, which were strewn with multi-colored sprinkles, were a real treat. They were marketed as having “spangled every aspect with sprinkles” before being discontinued in 1998.

McDonald’s Arch Deluxe

Over the years, there have been several products that have been delayed or removed from the McDonald’s menu. The Arch Deluxe may be the one that many remember the most fondly.

McDonald’s Arch Deluxe

Starting in 1996, this hamburger was a big popularity at the legendary fast-food chain, and adults were its main target group. However, this was the burger’s Achilles heel, and it was ultimately regarded as one of the worst long-term disasters in McDonald’s history.

Dannon Sprinkl’ins Yogurt

Can you possibly go wrong with sparkles all over your yogurt? Dannon undoubtedly recognized this in the 1990s, and they were fast to launch their own Sprinkl’ins Yogurt.

Dannon Sprinkl’ins Yogurt

While the name was a little strange to read, it was easy to consume. This item, which was released in 1995, barely lasted around five years, leaving it trapped in the twentieth century. We do wish it was a part of this one as well.

Jell-O Salads

There are a few Jell-O items on this list that have been discontinued. Even if everyone may create their own in principle, there was a period when one could just buy a Jell-O salad from the shop.

Jell-O Salads

While the label “salad” was loosely applied to this product, these gelatin molds were a tremendous popularity for years before being formally withdrawn in the 1990s. Sure, strawberry pretzel salads are still popular, but there are many more that aren’t.

Berry Berry Kix

Parents are always attempting to include fruits and vegetables in their children’s meals. This cereal made an attempt to include the former. The Berry Berry Kix was first presented in 1992.

Berry Berry Kix

On the package, this cereal was characterized as a “sweetened corn cereal” with “natural fruit tastes.” The lovely clusters that comprised the box’s contents were adorable fruit chunks. Many others thought they looked like little bunches of grapes. Even so, it wasn’t enough to keep it going.

Oreo O’s Cereal

It is no surprise that Oreo enjoys supplying the globe with their own cereals. But, at the end of the day, how nutritious can they be? Oreo O’s Cereal was first introduced to the public in the 1990s. However, when Post separated from the Kraft Foods Group, the cereal vanished.

Oreo O’s Cereal

At the very least, it was no longer being manufactured. Don’t worry, there are other Oreo cereals around that will satisfy your biscuit cravings. And if you’re looking for something sweet to start your day, there will always be tons of sugary cereals in the aisle.

Tongue Splashers Gum

Never before has a paint can looked so good. Most petrol stations in the 1990s had one of these tubs open so kids could take pieces and pay at the counter. Tongue Splashers Gum did precisely what you’d expect it to do: it quickly dyed the tongues of millions of children.

Tongue Splashers Gum

Yet, when the gum was removed, the parents of these children rejoiced. No longer would they need to explain why their children had bright, neon tongues.  Having said that, there are still comparable gum items on the market, such as Double Bubble Painterz.

Pop Tarts Crunch

“Introducing Kellogg’s Pop-Tarts Crunch Cereal! For the First Time in History, Frosting, Filling, Crunch, and Sprinkles!” This was the message of the commercial for this legendary yet fleeting cereal.

Pop Tarts Crunch

This cereal debuted in 1994 and was an instant popularity, with two varieties: Frosted Strawberry and Frosted Brown Sugar Cinnamon. Why eat one large Pop-Tart when you can have 30-40 little ones in a bowl of milk? Despite this brilliant notion, they were doomed to fail.

Gator Gum

Gatorade is now one of the most popular sports beverages on the market. Many people may be surprised to learn that they formerly had their own gum — Gator Gum. This unique gum first appeared in the 1970s and lasted around 20/30 years until its death at the end of the 1990s.

Gator Gum

Gator Gum was available in both orange and lemon-lime tastes during its lifetime. However, we find it difficult to believe that it was able to quench your thirst.

Nintendo Cereal System

Back in the day, video game companies released their own cereals. Nintendo dared to produce the Nintendo Cereal System, which included a two-in-one motif. It was terminated at the turn of the century. These featured berry-flavored shields and “fruit-flavored” Marios, whatever that means.

Nintendo Cereal System

An untouched package of these classic delicacies sold for a whooping $207.50, according to Nintendo Life. For the price of a box of cereal? We don’t mind spending a $1 or two on a box of cornflakes.

When it comes to food and drinks in the 1990s, there were lots of unique and delectable alternatives. Unfortunately, you can’t find all of these goods on shop shelves anymore, so we’re missing out on some of our favorite childhood munchies. These are beverages and cuisines from the 1990s that we hope would return so we could enjoy them again.